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Walmart's Rotisserie Chicken Is Cheaper Than Costco's Right Now

Technically it is smaller, though.

With grocery prices so high, getting the best deal at the store is more important than ever. Year after year shoppers have flocked to two of the country's busiest and most beloved supermarkets because of their low prices, and of course, right now is no exception. But when it comes to one iconic item, one comes out on top in terms of affordably.

Both Costco and Walmart sell rotisserie chickens. Over 106 million of Costco's version was sold in 2021 for the same price it's been for decades—$4.99. That means that last year alone the company brought in almost $530 million from just this one item. In 2015, CFO Richard Galanti said the company loses money with each rotisserie chicken sold in the deli, but that they are willing to keep the price low for members. The deal is a huge draw for many. But as it turns out, Walmart sold around 625 million of their own version in 2017, and it is actually a little cheaper. (For more, These Are Costco's Most Popular Items Right Now.)

If you are buying one rotisserie chicken, Walmart's is cheaper than Costco's.

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We're strictly talking about the whole, traditional rotisserie chicken here. (Both grocery chains have other options like shredded and seasoned.) But one of Walmart's 29-ounce birds is $4.97 or $4.98, according to its website.

Walmart Rotisserie Chicken
Courtesy of Walmart

But what about the sizes?

The sizes of the birds have to be compared, of course. Costco is known for its bulk products, and this deli item is no exception. Reports say that it weighs around 3 pounds. Walmart's is 29 ounces, which is a little under 2 pounds. So technically Costco's is a better deal.

So while you are paying every so slightly less for Walmart's version, Costco's is the winner if you're looking to save in the long run.

And what about the taste?

costco rotisserie chicken 6
Kiersten Hickman/Eat This, Not That!

From families budgeting to individuals meal prepping, there have been a lot of taste tests between the two rotisserie chickens. Opinions differ—some call Walmart's option "thin" or "very fatty" while others say Costco's "messy" with thick bones and meat.

No matter which one you prefer, in the end grabbing one of these at the grocery store means you can feed quite a few people or enjoy several meals for just under $5. Here are some of our favorite rotisserie chicken recipes.

Amanda McDonald
Amanda has a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University and a bachelor's degree in digital journalism from Loyola University Chicago. Read more about Amanda